""" signal.signal(SIGHUP, SIG_DFL) signal.signal(SIGCHLD, SIG_DFL) signal.signal(SIGTERM, SIG_DFL) # restore the handler for SIGINT, # it's useful for debugging (show the stacktrace before exit) signal.signal(SIGINT, signal.default_int_handler) # Read the socket using fdopen instead of socket.makefile() because the latter # seems to be very

Socket. Return the file descriptor for the socket, or set if supplied. Size. Set/Return the size of the remote mailbox. Set by POPStat. Count. Set/Return the number of remote messages. Set during Login. Message. The last status message received from the server or a message describing any problem encountered. State Our standard socket range is available in quenched and tempered cast steel with mechanical properties meeting today’s tough market requirements. All our sockets are suitable for usage in a sub-zero temperature environment. Materials meet or exceed an impact value of > 42 Joule / -20°C Charpy-V. The current file is about 3 pages long and need to send it from the client to the server. I've tried malloc with free(), I am now trying the read stream and write stream, with the fdopen and the flush at the end. I'm new with Linux and didnt know where to place my question. I guess my question(s) are: how can I send the complete file to the server? I am playing around with sockets and have the following problem. I have the socket newsock created by accept(). This code: FILE *clstream = fdopen ( newsock, "rw" ); fputs ( "message\n", clstream ); fflush ( clstream ); does NOT send anything to the telnet client at the other end. Why? (gcc 3.3.3, glibc 2.3.3) Thomas Jollans Use dup() to obtain a duplicate file descriptor for passing to fdopen(). When you call fclose() that will be closed but the underlying socket will remain open and can be closed with close(): man 2 open man 2 read man 2 write man 3 fdopen Sockets. A socket is a communications endpoint. Datagram socket: Can send/receive datagrams — discrete chunks of data. Analogy: mailbox. Stream socket: is one end of a connection. A connection is a private communication channel between two communicating processes. The file descriptor may have been obtained from open(), creat(), pipe(), dup(), fcntl(), or socket(); inherited through fork(), posix_spawn(), or exec; or perhaps obtained by other means. The meanings of the mode arguments of fdopen() and fopen() differ.

Thanks for all those who replied. Finally I used this idea with more specific examples from Linux socket programming chap 10 "using standard IO on sockets". fdopen is fine but make sure you use different streams for input and output

Thanks for all those who replied. Finally I used this idea with more specific examples from Linux socket programming chap 10 "using standard IO on sockets". fdopen is fine but make sure you use different streams for input and output Suppose instead that the open socket's file descriptor is passed to two calls to fdopen, to make two streams. The first call has second argument "w" and the second call has second argument "r".

The current file is about 3 pages long and need to send it from the client to the server. I've tried malloc with free(), I am now trying the read stream and write stream, with the fdopen and the flush at the end. I'm new with Linux and didnt know where to place my question. I guess my question(s) are: how can I send the complete file to the server?

It waits here until a client contacts it. At that point, it receives a new socket, c, which it can use to communicate with this particular client. It uses the C function fdopen to turn the socket from a low-level file descriptor to a C-style FILE pointer. This will allow the use of fprintf later on. from the socket file descriptor using fdopen. After understanding I need two streams (one for reading and on for writing), now I'm able to send messages over socket using fprintf. Now the problem is the reception that I wanted to do with getline() function or similar. The big problem is I don't want it to block the RETURN VALUES. If successful, fdopen() returns a pointer to a stream. On failure, it returns a NULL pointer and errno is set to one of the following values: . EBADF . The fildes argument is not a valid file descriptor.. EINVAL . The value of the type argument is invalid.. EMFILE . Too many file descriptors are open in the calling process. By the way, socket.fdopen duplicates the descriptor, so it doesn't need to be explicitly discarded. The above code leaks rawfd. I'll accept a patch that adds an option to tell .fdopen to take ownership of the existing descriptor number. But because stale descriptors are perhaps the biggest source of bugs in asynchronous networking software, I Windows Sockets 2 is designed for use by C/C++ programmers. Familiarity with Windows networking is required. Run-time requirements. Windows Sockets 2 can be used on all Windows platforms. Where certain implementations or capabilities of Windows Sockets 2 platform restrictions do exist, they are clearly noted in the documentation. In this section The specified type must be compatible with the access method you used to open the file. If the file was opened with the O_APPEND flag, the stream mode must be a, a+, ab, a+b, or ab+.To use the fdopen() function you need a file descriptor. To get a descriptor use the POSIX function open().The O_APPEND flag is a mode for open().Modes for open() are defined in QSYSINC/H/FCNTL.